Planning and Design Currently Underway for Gateway Green Open Space

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Gateway Green is a 35-acre parcel of mostly vacant land and located at the intersection of two interstate highways in Portland, Oregon and adjacent to the Gateway Urban Renewal area. The land is owned by the City of Portland Bureau of Parks and Recreation. Planning and design is currently underway for Phase One development of the property. The project began as an effort of local land owners and open space advocates in an effort to catalyze economic growth in outer east Portland.  On a pro-bono basis, designers collaborated with local stakeholders to create a program and vision for Gateway Green. Through conversations and input from technical experts and the community a vision for the site was developed that identified the following project goals:

  • Improving environmental conditions, especially water and air quality, and wildlife habitat.
  • Providing a regional recreational destination, especially for bicycle and pedestrian opportunities.
  • Providing open space and a possible branding opportunity for adjacent Gateway Regional Center and surrounding neighborhoods.
  • Highlighting Portland’s evolving sustainable marketplace and expressing our region’s use of sustainable design solutions.

As part of the six-month project the design team conducted a one-day community charrette to develop the design of the initial concept plan. After development of the preliminary vision the team conducted technical review meetings to ensure the technical viability of concept options, approaches, details, and strategies. A final presentation of the revised vision plan was then presented to the community. The Gateway Green vision plan demonstrates a commitment to sustainability, puts the property to better use for the good of the community, and sets an example for reclamation and reuse of surplus or underused properties around the country.

 

Paradise Under the Asphalt

Last weekend, GreenWorkers pitched in at Astor Elementary School’s depaving where a group of 100 volunteers spent a Saturday removing 5,000 square feet of asphalt. The demolition was orchestrated by Depave (depave.org) whose mission is to assist communities in transforming their pavement lots into neighborhood greenspaces. The asphalt removal is making way for a new playground which includes a turf mound, group swings, tree groves, and a custom log and boulder climber. GreenWorks was directly hired by Astor PTSO to design the playground which is on schedule for construction this summer.

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Confluence Site Dedication

The Confluence Project recently held a dedication for the Confluence Listening Circle  at Chief Timothy Park near Clarkston, Washington. Check out the video below to see highlights from the ceremony. You can find out more about the project here.

Dedication Ceremony for Confluence Listening Circle at Chief Timothy Park from Confluence Project on Vimeo.

What is a Log Dog?

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We hear this a lot in reference to the art feature of the Clay Street Green Street project in Portland’s Central Eastside Industrial District (CEID). The Log Dog sculptures incorporated into the Clay Street swales reference and celebrate the district’s industrial past. In the 19th Century, the lumber industry used the Willamette River as a conduit for transporting logs to the lumber mills established along the banks of the river. Logs were tied together into rafts and piloted down the Willamette in massive convoys. These log rafts where chained together by cable that ran through attachments known as log dogs. The historic log dogs were like thick needles, driven into the floating logs before a cable was pulled through the eye and cinched to bundle them together, creating a raft.
GreenWorks designed the streetscape for a 12-block section of SE Clay Street. Working with KPFF and artist, Linda M. Wysong, the green street provides a pedestrian friendly corridor from the Ladd’s Addition neighborhood to the Eastbank Esplanade, strengthening connectivity and improving the pedestrian realm. The green street honors the industrial district’s history through the art installations and interpretive elements.
GreenWorks has contributed to the redevelopment of Portland’s Central Eastside Industrial District (CEID) over the last decade through improvements to the Clay Street Right of Way / RiverEast pedestrian plaza and most recently with Clay Street Green Street. The completed project provides sustainable environmental benefits, including vegetated stormwater management, pedestrian and bicycle passage, and strategies that maintain freight movement and business activities throughout the CEID.

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The project’s artist describes the inspiration on the Clay Street Log Dog:
“The Wetlands were filled, the mill erected and a city built. The land is transformed as the water continues to flow. It may seep into the earth or be hidden by stone and concrete, but it continues to connect, sustain and give form to our lives. Honor and protect the river.”
Linda M. Wysong, artist

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Bend Whitewater Park (Formerly known as Colorado Dam Safe Passage Project)

The Colorado Avenue Dam improvements are well underway. Photos show the construction of the three channels in the Deschutes River: (1) a safe passage channel for boaters, paddleboarders and tubers, (2) a whitewater surfpark with four wave features and (3) a natural area with enhanced fish and wildlife habitat. The river will also have improved access from a new pedestrian bridge.

There will be a gathering to celebrate the whitewater surfpark on May 27th from 6-11pm at the Volcanic Theatre Pub. Check out the Bend Paddle Trail Alliance for more details.

View of the construction from the pedestrian bridge.

View of construction from the pedestrian bridge.

Large sandbags are used to form a cofferdam to divert water during construction.

Large sandbags are used to form a cofferdam to divert water during construction.

The boulders will form the permanent lining of the channels.

The boulders will form the permanent lining of the channels.

GreenWorks Hosts Students from University of Oregon

Alison Lewis- 2nd year MLA Krisztian Megyeri- 2nd year MLA Virginia (Gini) Piercy- 3rd year MLA Ellee Stapleton- 2nd year MLA

Virginia (Gini) Piercy- 3rd year MLA
Ellee Stapleton- 2nd year MLA
Alison Lewis- 2nd year MLA
Krisztian Megyeri- 2nd year MLA
Mike Corrente – GreenWorks

 

On January 30th, GreenWorks hosted four college students from the University of Oregon as part of the 22nd Annual Shadow Mentor Day, an event organized by the Department of Landscape Architecture, Student ASLA and ASLA Oregon. The students spent part of the day with GreenWork’s staffers-Michael Corrente, Ben Johnson, Shawn Kummer, and Robin Moodie-who each gave presentations about the effort and commitment behind a variety of project types, as well as providing insight into the role professionals’ play in marketing efforts. After a casual Q and A lunch with GreenWorks staff, the students toured a few recent and past projects giving the students a broad overview of the Landscape Architecture profession.

Mirror Pond, Celilo Falls and Centennial Mills in the news

Recently, a few of GreenWorks’ projects have been in the press.

In early November, The Bend Bulletin published the preferred graphics for Mirror Pond. Check out the article to see what GreenWorks and Inter-Fluve have planned for the iconic site in Bend, Oregon. You can also view the graphics below.

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The DJC also published two articles regarding Celilo Falls and Centennial Mills, projects that GreenWorks has been working on for some time. You can read them here and here.

Portland’s first official nature play area is officially open!

On any given day, Portland’s brand new nature-based play area at Westmoreland Park is packed with up to a hundred kids playing in the sand and water area, climbing on the boulder and log climbing features, or building forts with large sequoia branches. Parents are not only watching the imaginative play that all the natural elements inspire, but are also participating with the kids to explore the play area’s unique features. Located in the Sellwood-Moreland neighborhood of Portland, Westmoreland Nature Play Area was born of the desire to update the existing outdated play area and replace it with a 100% custom nature-based play environment. The total play area is approximately one acre and allows families to build their own play experience.  The project received a 2014 Honor Award from the Oregon Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects.

GreenWorks was selected by Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) to update the existing outdated playground and replace it with a 100% custom nature-based play environment. PP&R recognized the value in nature-based play for local children and proposed that the Westmoreland Playground be a pilot project for a natural play environment. GreenWorks worked with the client, public, and design team to define how nature-based play would function for this particular site. The design team included environmental artist, Adam Kuby. Adam not only helped envision individual artistic elements within the park as play features, but also collaborated with the design team on the overall conceptual design of the playground that represents the restoration of the adjacent Crystal Springs.

A 4 year-old is verifying the willow whips are secure along the creek channel.

A 4 year-old is verifying the willow whips are secure along the creek channel.

Logs extend from the Mountain Mound (back right) and are situated to provide connection to the log tilt (back left).

Logs extend from the Mountain Mound (back right) and are situated to provide connection to the log tilt (back left).

Kid’s take turns at the farm pump on top of the creek mound to activate the water in the sand and water play area.

Kid’s take turns at the farm pump on top of the creek mound to activate the water in the sand and water play area.

Rope helps kids climb up and down the log climbers.

Rope helps kids climb up and down the log climbers.

Branches were trimmed by PP&R to provide better visual access through the adjacent Sequoia grove and loose parts that were used to make a make-shift fort.

Branches were trimmed by PP&R to provide better visual access through the adjacent Sequoia grove and loose parts that were used to make a make-shift fort.

Habitat Restoration Planting Day at New Light Rail Transit Center

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A community volunteer planting event was held on Saturday October 11th to restore an environmentally degraded area adjacent to the new Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Park and Ride transit center under construction at the southwest corner of McLoughlin Blvd and Park Ave. The event was well attended by local community member volunteers eager to get their hands dirty and plant hundreds of new native trees and plants, including GreenWorks staff member Shawn Kummer and daughter Aydan. GreenWorks was involved in this project’s preliminary planting design as part of the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail project. The project was made possibly by the efforts by local environmental group Urban Green and a Metro Nature in the Neighborhoods grant.

http://koin.com/2014/10/11/forest-planned-for-new-park-ride-transit-center/

Pringle Creek is a “Diamond for Sustainability”

Check out this recent article by Margaret Buranen at Stormwater: The Journal for Surface Water Quality Professionals about green infrastructure in stormwater management, featuring a recent GreenWorks project in Salem, OR!

Pringle Creek Community is one of Oregon’s most low-impact residential developments, and as the first sustainable housing and mixed-use project spanning 32 acres of a total 250 scheduled for development, Pringle Creek is pioneering green initiatives in southeast Salem.

Pringle House Pringle Playground

Pringle Creek is, according to the Community’s general manager Jane Poznar, “a diamond for sustainability” with its 7,000 feet of green streets, 2,000 feet of green alleys, and a newly ‘salmon safe’ creek (from which the community gets its name). Regarding stormwater, Buranen notes that Pringle Creek Community is also home to “one of the largest pervious asphalt street systems in the United States,” handling 90% of runoff onsite.

Pringle Street Plan Pringle Street

GreenWorks was responsible for collaboration on the design of the Community’s green streets and rain gardens, pedestrian pathways and greenway enhancement, woonerfs and public recreational spaces, overall landscape treatment and the Village Green open space.

Village Green

The project was awarded the Land Development of the Year Award in 2007 from the National Home Builder’s Association.

Groundbreaking at Trillium Creek Park

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City of Damascus and North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District recently celebrated the groundbreaking at Trillium Creek Park. Trillium will be the City’s first full-fledged neighborhood park consisting of a large playground, basketball court, picnic area, and open lawn all developed within a one acre footprint. The layout of the park provides a balance of uses and a playground that is inclusive for children of all abilities. The playground design incorporated an accessible path that will lead children to an high point on the site connecting them to a playground structure that sits five-feet high above the surrounding playground.

After working with the City, NCPRD, and community over the last two years developing the concept and construction drawings for the park, we are excited to see the project moving forward and getting built. T-Edge Construction is the contractor.

 

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GreenWorks Uses Werbin Park Project as Teaching Tool for Youth Program

As part of the Werbin Park development with the City of Portland Parks & Recreation, GreenWorks is supporting the Cully Neighborhood’s commitment to social equity. GreenWorks is providing outreach for underprivileged neighborhood children who, ultimately, are the true clients of this new park. The Werbin Park project is being used as a platform for teaching kids in the program about park design and the building process.  Partnered with Verde and Hacienda’s Expresiones after school program which engages 5th, 6th and 7th graders during the summer, GreenWorks is providing a series of events with Expresiones. The program consists of six weeks of activities including a site visit to Werbin Park and other similar parks. On the first field trip to GreenWorks, students learned about the design process, saw how construction drawings are put together, and participated in activities to develop their design skills. GreenWorks employees Ben Johnson, Claire Maulhardt and Jeff Boggess planned the interactive office visit with the students.

GreenWorks is working with Travis Ruybal (City of Portland), Tony Defalco and Nestor Campos (Verde), and Anna Gordon (Expresiones, Hacienda) in planning the summer field trips.

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Outside taking some measurements! Expresiones, Hacienda’s after school program for kindergarten through eighth grade, visit GreenWorks, P.C. (From Left to Right: Nestor Campos, Jordi Bautista, Carmen Cortez, Carlos Cortez, Amberlee Riscajche, Guillermina Mendoza, Anna Gordon, Carlos Escalera, Jordi Moo, Ben Johnson – GW.)

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Can four people walk side by side down an eight foot pathway and have someone else pass them in the opposite direction? GreenWorks organized spatial exercises demonstrating how the size and layout of elements like pathways and plazas relate to the number of users.

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GreenWorks conducted a small drawing exercise showing the students how to start drawing a perspective. Each student designed the shape of their new house in plan and then learned the steps of turning that plan drawing into a 3D shape. See the wonderful drawings they produced below!

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Carlos Cortez

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Amberlee Riscajche

Metro Natural Areas Levy Passed!

On Tuesday, Metro region voters approved a property tax levy to pay for parks and natural areas funding. The tax will provide Metro with approximately $10 million a year for maintenance and restoration at its properties. Read the full article here.

GreenWorks is pleased that the region has spoken in favor of funding parks and natural areas. As landscape architects we support this movement to protect the area’s vibrant network of outdoor destinations and protected land. As volunteers and consultants we’ve collaborated with Metro for many years and look forward to working together on future projects that safeguard our parks and natural areas for future generations.

Birdseye Rendering of Graham Oaks Nature Park

Aerial Birdseye Rendering of Graham Oaks Nature Park in Wilsonville

Wilsonville SMART Operations Fleet Facility Construction Complete

Construction has been completed on the City of Wilsonville South Metro Area Regional Transit (SMART)  Operations Fleet Facility.  The project includes a 12,600 square foot Fleet and Administration Building located on an approximately 4.5 acre site.  Site improvements include employee and bus parking, fleet maintenance, and administrative services, and is located on SW Boberg Road adjacent to the Wilsonville Westside Express Service (WES) Station.

Design services provided by GreenWorks, include Conceptual Site Design and Grading Coordination, type ‘C’ Tree Preservation and Removal Plans, and Final Construction Documentation.  The design team developed a budget sensitive sustainable plan that embraces the natural characteristics of the site, and architectural design features.  Habitat and buffering improvements integrated adjacent to the Significant Resource Overlay Zone (SROZ), provide a transition and embraced the landscape strategy of incorporating native and drought tolerant plants, in combination with a temporary irrigation system.  Stormwater is managed through on site conveyance in channels and basins, and is celebrated through roof rainwater capture and outfall at architectural scuppers along the building entrance.

Building Entry

Entry Conveyance Swale

It’s National Arbor Month and National Landscape Architecture Month!

April is a busy month for landscape architects and lovers of trees.  This month is dedicated to Arbor Month and National Landscape Architecture Month (NLAM).

The City of Portland began the celebration for Arbor Month by adorning valuable trees with price tags.  The city is holding events all month long for those interested in getting involved and learning about Portland’s trees!

On the national front, National Landscape Architecture Month brings awareness to the profession and our role in the built environment. This year’s theme is Healthy Living Through Design.  Check it out!

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Photo by Brad Schmidt, The Oregonian

 

Grant High School Community Garden Construction Complete!

Northeast Portland Community Gardeners are happily planting, watering, weeding and harvesting food from their plots at the Grant High School Community Garden. The Environmental Club at the High School teamed up with Portland Community Gardens to transform a 7,700 square foot piece of lawn in the front of the school to a garden for the surrounding community. GreenWorks provided the garden design to maximize plot size, provide clear circulation,  and create an aesthetically pleasing space that fits the context of the historic architecture of the school and neighborhood.

Grant High School Community Garden

The Environmental Club at Grant High School in Northeast Portland is in the process of establishing a Community Garden and a Learning Garden in the front of the school. Their inspiration for the gardens came from a desire to give back to the local community, provide fresh food from the garden to the cafeteria, and learn about sustainable agriculture. The students received a grant from State Farm and have teamed up with Portland Community Gardens to make their dream a reality. The Environmental Club enlisted the help of GreenWorks to create a design for the garden that would be aesthetically pleasing to the surrounding community, include two ADA accessible plots, and maximize the available garden space.

Grant High School Community Garden Design

The gardens are located in front of the school in the NE corner of the existing lawn on NE 36th Avenue. Portland Community Gardens will assign the community garden plots on a first come first served basis. The learning garden will be maintained by the environmental club and sustainable agriculture classes as well as the biology, special education and Japanese departments.

On February 16th the Environmental Club and Portland Community Gardens held a Town Hall event where they invited the local community to ask questions and express their concerns about the garden. The attendees voiced an enormous amount of support and enthusiasm for the project. Neighbors are eager to get a spot secured and start gardening!

Two members of the Environmental Club build raised beds for the Learning Garden

GreenWorks was honored to contribute to the creation of the Grant High School Community and Learning Gardens. The Environmental Club has been working on the garden’s implementation for over a year now, coming up against many set-backs and logistical road blocks. They are truly a remarkable group of students who simply wanted to give back to the surrounding community, supply their cafeteria with fresh and healthy food and provide an opportunity for future students to learn about sustainable agriculture.  Follow the Grant High School Community Garden blog here.

Students planting garlic in their classroom nursery in preparation for the upcoming growing season