Orange Line Featured in May LAM Magazine

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Check out the May issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine with a feature article about the TriMet Orange Line Portland –Milwaukie Light Rail (PMLR) project. GreenWorks was part of the team that assisted TriMet in the regional effort to extend light rail service from downtown Portland to downtown Milwaukie and North Clackamas County. The Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail project is a vital transportation element in the region’s strategy to manage growth and build livable communities for future generations. GreenWorks provided landscape architectural services for the final design of the Portland Milwaukie Light Rail including planting and irrigation design, green infrastructure, sustainability initiatives, and art coordination. The team also assisted in coordination and collaboration efforts with TriMet, Clackamas County, Multnomah County, the cities of Portland, Milwaukie and Oregon City, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Portland Development Commission.

The new bridge built for the Orange Line, Tilikum Crossing, is named after the Chinook word for people to promote this unifying vision for the project. The opening of the Orange Line poses a new manner of viewing the cities of Portland and Milwaukie as connected communities. Rail tracks are all too often a symbol of division. The design for the Orange Line rejects this archetype. Our landscape approach was informed by the connectivity that is inherent to the project and will strengthen the region over time. The project is a catalyst to fundamentally heal the urban fabric socially, culturally, and environmentally. This concept is manifested in every detail of the project, from the overall vision down to the plants selected. Our design team chose fast-growing, pioneer species that colonize and begin the process of natural repair to the site disrupted by the new infrastructure. These plantings quickly create mass and scape for an immediate recognizable identify. The design also includes stable, mature plant communities to support and achieve the long-term aspirations, which stich the neighborhoods and the communities to the station areas. The Orange Line PMLR project is above all about connecting people and bringing economic vibrancy to the Portland Milwaukie transit corridor.

https://landscapearchitecturemagazine.org/ (also available at Powell’s City of Books)

Nature-Based Play in the Press

Check out the links below to see the most recent articles about our exciting nature-based play area projects around Portland!

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This Metro Parent article includes a map of nature play areas in the Portland metro region and stars 8 GreenWorks projects: The All-Natural Playground

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The Oregonian on Marshall Park: Q&A: Creator of ‘Children at Nature Play’ signs hopes to get more kids outdoors

Pages from LAM_03Mar2015_OregonPlaygrounds-spreadsLandscape Architecture Magazine on Westmoreland: Go Wild, Oregon Child

Zidell Yards Recognized at 2014 ASLA Annual Conference

Mike Faha of GreenWorks  and  former GreenWorker David Elkin attended the ASLA Annual Conference where they received the National Honor Award for the Zidell Green Infrastructure Scenarios project.

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Dave Elkin (Left) and Mike Faha (right) prepare to accept the Honor Award at the ASLA Annual Conference.

The Zidell Yards Green Infrastructure Scenarios present a unique opportunity to develop on brownfield sites without causing harm to the environment. To read more about what is planned for this site, check out today’s story in the DJC here.

Mirror Pond, Celilo Falls and Centennial Mills in the news

Recently, a few of GreenWorks’ projects have been in the press.

In early November, The Bend Bulletin published the preferred graphics for Mirror Pond. Check out the article to see what GreenWorks and Inter-Fluve have planned for the iconic site in Bend, Oregon. You can also view the graphics below.

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The DJC also published two articles regarding Celilo Falls and Centennial Mills, projects that GreenWorks has been working on for some time. You can read them here and here.

Westmoreland Nature Play Receives Honor Award

Westmoreland Nature Play was recently recognized by the Oregon Chapter of ASLA with an Honor Award for design. We would like to thank our entire team for all their contributions. Thanks especially to Portland Parks and Recreation for their support and desire to connect kids with nature.

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Children can move and manipulate loose parts of the play area to create a fort and tailor their own play experience. The Sequoia branches were taken from the grove of trees in the park

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Logs and boulders are arranged in a variety of ways to provide climbing and balancing challenges for kids of all ages. The logs in the foreground are extensions that lead kids between the Mountain Mound and Log Tilt in the background.

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The Large Log Climbers in the background hint at what it is like to climb trees. In the foreground, one of the six carved stones tells the story of rainwater’s journey from the forest to the stream.

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The creek channel is an 80’ long and meanders along a large sand pit. Water weaves its way around recycled concrete cubes and boulders and under willow domes to provide a unique play experience. Kids use sand to create dams to divert water into the sand play area.

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The hand pump is the metaphorical source of Crystal Springs located at the top of the Creek Mound. The kids at the pump have the power to activate the “stream” and can direct the water with weirs through several different channels down the Concrete Mound to the main creek channel.

Portland’s first official nature play area is officially open!

On any given day, Portland’s brand new nature-based play area at Westmoreland Park is packed with up to a hundred kids playing in the sand and water area, climbing on the boulder and log climbing features, or building forts with large sequoia branches. Parents are not only watching the imaginative play that all the natural elements inspire, but are also participating with the kids to explore the play area’s unique features. Located in the Sellwood-Moreland neighborhood of Portland, Westmoreland Nature Play Area was born of the desire to update the existing outdated play area and replace it with a 100% custom nature-based play environment. The total play area is approximately one acre and allows families to build their own play experience.  The project received a 2014 Honor Award from the Oregon Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects.

GreenWorks was selected by Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) to update the existing outdated playground and replace it with a 100% custom nature-based play environment. PP&R recognized the value in nature-based play for local children and proposed that the Westmoreland Playground be a pilot project for a natural play environment. GreenWorks worked with the client, public, and design team to define how nature-based play would function for this particular site. The design team included environmental artist, Adam Kuby. Adam not only helped envision individual artistic elements within the park as play features, but also collaborated with the design team on the overall conceptual design of the playground that represents the restoration of the adjacent Crystal Springs.

A 4 year-old is verifying the willow whips are secure along the creek channel.

A 4 year-old is verifying the willow whips are secure along the creek channel.

Logs extend from the Mountain Mound (back right) and are situated to provide connection to the log tilt (back left).

Logs extend from the Mountain Mound (back right) and are situated to provide connection to the log tilt (back left).

Kid’s take turns at the farm pump on top of the creek mound to activate the water in the sand and water play area.

Kid’s take turns at the farm pump on top of the creek mound to activate the water in the sand and water play area.

Rope helps kids climb up and down the log climbers.

Rope helps kids climb up and down the log climbers.

Branches were trimmed by PP&R to provide better visual access through the adjacent Sequoia grove and loose parts that were used to make a make-shift fort.

Branches were trimmed by PP&R to provide better visual access through the adjacent Sequoia grove and loose parts that were used to make a make-shift fort.

Poetry at the Beach Grand Opening

Come join GreenWorks and the Human Access Project (HAP) for Poetry at the Beach! Mike Faha, Principal of GreenWorks and current board member of HAP, and GreenWorks Landscape Designer Jeff Boggess assisted with the design of this poetry walk. GreenWorks is excited to support Will Levenson as Director of the Human Access Project and we look forward to further collaborations. See details of the event below.

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Check out what’s on our radar in the Portland area!

Cully Neighborhood Park

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Portland Parks and Recreation is moving forward with a neighborhood park in the Cully area this spring. The park will include a nature play area, picnic facilities and a Skate Dot. For more information about the park and GreenWorks’ role in its development,click here.

 

 

Gateway Green Campaign

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After years of grassroots campaigning, there is opportunity to transform public land into Gateway Green, a multi-use off road bike park. The Gateway Green Campaign is underway as organizers hope to raise $100,000 in donations necessary for the project. Click here to read more and participate.

Metro Natural Areas Levy Passed!

On Tuesday, Metro region voters approved a property tax levy to pay for parks and natural areas funding. The tax will provide Metro with approximately $10 million a year for maintenance and restoration at its properties. Read the full article here.

GreenWorks is pleased that the region has spoken in favor of funding parks and natural areas. As landscape architects we support this movement to protect the area’s vibrant network of outdoor destinations and protected land. As volunteers and consultants we’ve collaborated with Metro for many years and look forward to working together on future projects that safeguard our parks and natural areas for future generations.

Birdseye Rendering of Graham Oaks Nature Park

Aerial Birdseye Rendering of Graham Oaks Nature Park in Wilsonville

Mirror Pond Visioning Project in Bend, Oregon

GreenWorks has started consulting work with Bend Parks and Recreation District on alternatives that will provide four different solutions for the community to  consider for the iconic Mirror Pond on the Deschutes River in Bend, Oregon. Each option, ranging from taking out a dam to dredging or something in between, will illustrate the visual impact, cost estimates, regulatory requirements, challenges and opportunities.

GreenWorks visited the site recently. Click on this link to watch a video for more information

 

Mirror Pond in Bend, Oregon
Mirror Pond in Bend, Oregon

Madrona Studios Revitalizes Rose Quarter Housing

As part of the design team for Madrona Studios, GreenWorks provided landscape architecture services for the project, which is featured in the Fall Oregon Facilities issue highlighting the revitalized affordable housing building. Formerly a Ramada Inn within Portland’s Rose Quarter, Madrona Studios added 176 affordable housing units that now use, “27 percent less energy than a standard building of the same costs.”  The article explains ways the project team found to cut water, energy, heat, and lighting consumption for the retrofitted building.  The project resulted in an overall $42,000 annual cost savings for the project led by Central City Concern.

The full article can be found at:

http://issuu.com/jengomedia/docs/orfall2011?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222

GreenWorks designed frontage improvements that improve safety and accessibility for pedestrians and cyclists in and around the site. Frontage improvements include the conversion of a vacated street into a striking and lush new planting area that provides year-round interest along this heavily travelled corridor. Additionally, GreenWorks worked closely with architects and engineers in retrofitting the building’s parking garage deck to accommodate new ecoroof planting areas, a gathering area with special paving, and improved ADA-accessibility for residents.

Madrona Studios

Confluence Project Featured this Week on OPB’s “Think Out Loud”

Tomorrow’s Oregon Public Broadcasing “Think Out Loud” broadcast will feature Artist Maya Lin and the Confluence Projects for which GreenWorks is providing landscape architectural services.  Artist Maya Lin and Confluence Executive Director Jane Jacobsen will be sitting in with host Emily Harris at 9 a.m. Thursday  to discuss Ms. Lin’s approach to the series of interpretive sites in Oregon and Washington along the major rivers of the Pacific Northwest.

Individual sites are located along the Snake, Columbia, and Sandy Rivers and include site developments in support of Ms. Lin’s artwork, including:  viewpoints and overlooks, trails, parking, comfort stations, fish cleaning stations, information kiosks and other site facilities.  GreenWorks is responsible for detailed site design for multiple sites as well as leading an interdisciplinary team of engineers, designers, architects and regulatory professionals in the development of these sites.

You can listen to the broadcast and learn more at:

http://www.opb.org/thinkoutloud/shows/maya-lin-and-confluence-project/

 

Artist Maya Lin, on right, collaborating with Master Stone Mason, Pete Andrusko

 

GreenWorks Receives Julian Prize for Sustainability in Public Works

GreenWorks recently received the Julian Prize for Demonstrating Sustainability in Public Works based on their development guidelines work for the Clean Water Services Low Impact Development (LID) Approaches Handbook.

“The award recognizes individuals, practices or projects that showcase the role of public works in furthering the principles of sustainability.  The awards are intended to recognize systems thinking, long term design practices, and infrastructure systems that sustain society.  The awards are intended to further APWA’s purpose of education and recognition of excellence.” – APWA Oregon Chapter

GreenWorks worked with Clean Water Services to complement and update their current design and construction standards. The Handbook encourages the use of and simplifies the application of low impact development approaches that improve water quality and attenuate stormwater flows for the Tualatin River Watershed.  GreenWorks created a series of easy-to-read sketches and fact sheets that clearly show what current LID applications look like and how best to apply them through illustrative diagrams, explanatory text and photographs.

Headwaters at Tryon Creek Included in Sustainable Pilot Program

The Sustainable Sites Initiative chose GreenWorks’ project The Headwaters at Tryon Creek to participate in a two-year Pilot Program that will certify Headwaters as Pilot Certified.  Headwaters was selected among the diverse range of projects chosen, and will be in the first group to demonstrate the certification requirements in the United States.  Headwaters will undergo rigorous evaluation using the The Sustainable Sites Initiative: Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks 2009 that will look beyond sustainability and evaluate every aspect of the design and site, rating the project on a 4 star scale.  Check out the Sustainable Sites Initiative site for more information: http://www.sustainablesites.org/pilot/

GreenWorks’ Principal Jim Figurski weighed in on the Pilot program and the impact it holds on the landscape architecture industry in a Sustainable Business Oregon article published recently: http://www.sustainablebusinessoregon.com/articles/2010/05/three_oregon_sites_chosen_for_sustainable_pilot.html


Rockwood Station Design Improvements Underway

MAX Station Redesign (Image Courtesy of the DJC and Waterleaf Architecture)

GreenWorks worked with David Evans & Associates and Waterleaf Architects in providing conceptual planning and design for the redevelopment of TriMet’s Light Rail station at East 188th Street in the Rockwood neighborhood of Gresham, Oregon.  A neighborhood in transition, Rockwood is part of Gresham’s first Urban Renewal Area.  Station redesign focused on attracting redevelopment in the area through improvements to the 188th and East Burnside intersection, expanded access and capacity of the stations, pedestrian-oriented facilities, user safety, visibility and CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) design.  The station design exceeded the local stormwater requirements and incorporated infiltration planters adjacent to the platforms as a terminus for the platforms.  The approved design incorporated significant redevelopment of the transit platforms, shelters, trackways, signage, landscape plantings and other features.  Final presentation drawings and perspective sketches were prepared and presented to the Urban Renewal Commission.

A recent Daily Journal of Commerce article highlights this project and its design components, construction for the station begins this month.  The full article is posted on the DJC website and can be seen by clicking the link below:

MAX improvements could help improve Rockwood’s image

Join us for the groundbreaking of the Merlo Bus Fuel & Wash Facility and LIFT Building

The Merlo Bus Facility is TriMet’s primary facilities operation for the western service region.  This project constructed a new 19,000 sq. ft. operations facility within a fully built out site which needed to maintain its daily operation during construction.  GreenWorks provided design services for the site including new stormwater facilities, landscaping, and irrigation.  Design efforts included consideration and coordination with the existing CWS stormwater swales and THPRD’s Nature Park adjacent to the project site. Site design included street frontage improvements for accessibility and street trees.

Please join U.S. Congressman David Wu, Washington County Commission Chair Tom Brian, Beaverton Mayor Denny Doyle and TriMet General Manager Fred Hansen for the groundbreaking of two new facilities at our Merlo Bus Facility: a new bus fuel and wash facility, and a new building for our Westside LIFT service.

The $13.5 million project is made possible by federal stimulus funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

The Merlo Bus Facility is where TriMet’s Westside bus lines are fueled and washed each day and has been in failing condition for many years. This project will construct a new 19,000 sq. ft. facility. The Westside LIFT facility supports TriMet’s door-to-door ADA service. The current LIFT building is leased, and the building owner’s desire is to use this building. TriMet will construct a new 4,700 sq. ft. building for its Westside administration functions. Construction of both buildings will take approximately one year to complete.

Wednesday, February 17, 9 a.m.

Merlo Bus Facility

16130 SW Merlo Rd.

Beaverton, OR 97006

“Green” is the theme around theater

GreenWorks recently completed work on a rain garden plan and landscaping additions, implementing “green technology” around a new Canby Cinema.  Read more below in this article by John Baker of the Canby Herald.

Landscaping designs incorporate green techniques

By: John Baker

Walking slowly around the new Canby Cinema 8, it’s easy to miss the “green” feel that runs throughout the facility.

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Specially designed pavers will move rainwater into specially designed areas for reuse in green landscaping. Photo by John Baker

 

 

But don’t be fooled. Turning rainwater into something more than a puddle took planning, commitment and a willingness to go state-of-the-art. Turns out, the “green street project” at the cinema delivered.
Matilda Deas, project planner for the city, said the idea to “go green” came about through some other projects she’s working on for the city — transportation system plan update, subdivision design standards and park planning.

“What has happened is that the city has very little piped sites and has dealt with dry wells in the past,” said Deas. “Well, DEQ is not incredibly happy with dry wells. We’ve known for a long time we needed to be looking at alternatives. Through a lot of discussion and research, we found that green streets and rain gardens are well establishedthat the DEQ likes them.
“When the cinema project came up, we thought this would be a wonderful opportunity to do a demonstration site for what we could do in the commercial realm,” Deas added.

With that, Deas and the city approached Greenworks Landscape Architecture of Portland about what might be possible in and around the cinema.

Working with the city’s public works department and Director Dwayne Barnes, Greenworks came up with an innovative plan to create a rain garden and other landscaping additions that put rainwater to use rather than let it sit around and pool up.
Landscaping around the theater was going green.

“Our goal was to improve the drainage of our city streets by using green technology,” Barnes explained, “rather than rely on dry wells or surface water sources. We’re really happy it turned out so well. A lot of it was just kind of a vision at first — it’s kind of our pilot project.”

Barnes agreed with Deas, saying many of the green street techniques used in this project will show up in future design models for Canby.

“We’re kind of excited,” said Deas. “We’ve got the rain garden and some things in the parking lot and all kinds of plants to absorb the water. It’s a brand new concept for us, but not one that’s been untested — it’s kind of state-of-the-art that works.”

The design incorporates channels cut into the curbs that direct water to the growth features — the rain garden.

Using 25,000 square feet of pervious pavers will allow detention and percolation of rain water in the parking lot, rather than become a big pool of water.

“This slows the water down so it doesn’t flood,” said Deas. “It’s very cool. It’s just a fantastic project and if it hadn’t been for the very supportive work of the public works department, we wouldn’t have been able to do it. Kudos to Dwayne Barnes and his department.”

For Barnes’ department, the maintenance will be nothing out of the ordinary. For the pervious pavers, the public works department will have to use a mechanical sweeper to keep the leaves and debris cleared off the pavers.

Along Second Street, Barnes said the water will come right off the street into the rain garden where it will drain into 18 inches of soil and then hit a rock area covered by fabric.
From there, it simply leeches into the soil.

The city’s new street sweeper will keep leaves and other debris from fouling the drainage to the rain garden. They’ll also need to maintain the gardens with regular cleanup, but all-in-all, the green street project won’t require a lot of extra upkeep.