Sandy River Bird Blind

GreenWorks provided site design, agency coordination, permitting services and construction administration to the Confluence Project throughout the planning, design and construction of the Sandy River Bird Blind project.  The Bird Blind project is one of several environmental and historical art installations artist Maya Lin commissioned for the Confluence Project to celebrate the journey of exploration and discovery of Lewis and Clark.
At the end of a 1.2 mile trail, built primarily by volunteers, you stroll up a gently curving 150-foot ramp to the Bird Blind, constructed of sustainably harvested, durable black locust wood. From this quiet spot, you can view birds and wildlife that inhabit the area today as you learn about the flora and fauna-some of which are now extinct, endangered or threatened species that existed on this site 200 years ago. The artwork serves as a lasting reminder of the impact humans have had on the environment and as a model for a new way to envision the connection between people and the natural world.
The black locust wood used to build the bird blind is a long-lasting, sustainable hardwood that is considered an invasive species in the Northwest. Using locally harvested black locust for this project supports efforts to eradicate the tree from our native forests and reinforces the Confluence Project’s goal of promoting sustainability. The vertical wooden slats of the bird blind are inscribed with the name and current status of each of the 134 species Lewis and Clark noted on their westward journey.

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Reed's Crossing

Reed’s Crossing is a 463 acre mixed-use community in Hillsboro that includes over 4,000 new homes of various type. The Reed’s Crossing project will implement a natural area utilized for stormwater management and public open space for the community. The 20-acre natural area will encompass a variety of ecotones including oak savanna prairie, grass prairie, and wet meadow. GreenWorks provided conceptual design services for park and open space development including planting plans, tree preservation and park diagrams, and an extensive bike and pedestrian trail design.  GreenWorks continues to work with Newland Communities by furthering conceptual designs and planting plans, developing grading plans for each concept, estimating potential costs, and strategizing on phasing and maintenance for the project.

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Fairview Woods Park

Fairview Woods Park is a renovation of an existing open space to a neighborhood Park and an example of where we successfully used a sustainability filter to improve park conditions and facilities. Some trails and interpretation existed at the park but graffiti, inappropriate park use and gunfire were common in the park and neighbors were concerned about safety. GreenWorks and SWCA environmental developed a conceptual plan and construction documents to address park safety and upgrade facilities to meet neighborhood recreation needs and provide access to wetland and riparian areas. We also addressed creek and wetland protection and sustainability on site by including native plant community restoration, vegetation management to provide visual corridors, minimal tree removal, use of downed woody debris for interpretive and plaza features, wetland trail improvements, trail decommissioning, minimized parking including ADA space, and upgraded trails to meet ADA standards.

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The RiverEast Center Plaza and Shared Green Street

The Holman Building, redeveloped for commercial mixed – use as the RiverEast Center, includes office space for two corporate headquarters and retail uses. RiverEast is an important project in the redevelopment of Portland’s inner eastside, located adjacent to the Willamette River and Certified LEED Gold. Major site design components included converting the Clay Street ROW adjacent to the building into a pedestrian plaza that provides a connection for eastside neighborhoods to the Willamette River Greenway. Unique features include creating a green parking lot, retrofitting Water Avenue to a Green Street, conveying and treating rooftop runoff with artistic downspouts and stormwater basins, and re-using recycled materials from building demolition for site wall features. The project exceeds City of Portland standards for stormwater management by treating roof runoff from the building through stormwater flow-through planters. The development was coordinated with many local agencies including Portland Development Commission, Portland Bureau of Planning, Portland Bureau of Transportation, and Bureau of Environmental Services. The project relies heavily on native planting schemes to conserve water consumption and promote bio-diversity. GreenWorks services included schematic design, design development,  and construction documentation services.

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Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility

GreenWorks is part of a multi-disciplinary team on the renovation of this regional waste water treatment facility in historic downtown Oak Harbor, Washington. Situated in Windjammer Park on the shores of Oak Harbor the facility will take advantage of technological updates to modernize the facility, integrate it with the surrounding environment and reduce its visual and olfactory impacts.  Pedestrian and automobile circulation on either side of the facility provides primary access from downtown Oak Harbor to Windjammer Park and the waterfront. The site plan requires the creation of strong physical and visual links along these axes. The planting and hardscape will reflect the coastal setting with the inclusion of rolling dunes planted with coastal grasses and perimeter sidewalks that will emulate local wooden docks. Parts of the facility will be exposed to the public offering opportunities for interpretation along the two main thoroughfares.

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Sisters Cascade Ave Streetscape

GreenWorks was part of the team working on the Cascade Avenue (US 20) Streetscape Plan in the City of Sisters. US 20 provides a connection across the Cascades Mountains between the growing communities of Central Oregon and the Willamette Valley’s major population centers. Thousands of trucks and passenger vehicles travel through the tourism-based town of Sisters each day making US 20 both a main street and a major regional freight route. As a result, alleviating conflicts between local and through traffic and pedestrians enjoying the vibrant business district along this corridor was a major goal of the project.

The Cascade Avenue Streetscape design makes improvements to US 20 that address pedestrian/motorist conflicts, improve the walk-ability of downtown, and express the identity of the City of Sisters. The project team presented five different streetscape design concepts with various alternatives for each set of streetscape features, including trees, furniture, and paving. These were reviewed by the community at a series of open house sessions. The design team subsequently synthesized the community’s input into the Preferred Streetscape Design Concept. The result is improved safety along the corridor, green street improvements, design features that express the community identity of Sisters, and economic development within the community. The project was completed in 2014.

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The Encore

Located at the intersection of NW Overton and 9th Street in the heart of the Pearl District, this site is home to a 15-story condominium residential tower. GreenWorks was hired to provide landscape architectural elements for the development parcel, and adjacent public properties. GreenWorks designed a dramatic entry plaza, park lane, enhanced pedestrian areas, and a viewing garden that will be energized by stomwater runoff flowing over recycled glass. This project is targeting LEED Silver achievement.

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Washougal Town Square

Located at the City Center, this mixed use office/retail project was envisioned to be a catalyst for town center redevelopment. GreenWorks designed the site improvements to reinforce pedestrian and visual connections to the urban fabric and to the Columbia River Gorge area as a demonstration project. GreenWorks implemented goals for a sustainable development model by creatively designing stormwater solutions, rainwater harvesting, a central courtyard, and native plantings in an urban context for the one block development. GreenWorks used 3-D modeling to enable the design team, developer and local staff to visualize design solutions. This project is one of the 10 LEED-ND pilot projects by the USGBC for the nation.

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Beranger Condominiums Ecoroof

GreenWorks was responsible for a number of sustainable strategies for the Béranger Condominiums. The ecoroof project, the first in the City of Gresham, included 3,000 s.f. of extensive vegetated rooftop area. In addition, the project included using rooftop flow-through planters in tandem with the ecoroof for an integrated stormwater strategy that manages all of the building run-off prior to it reaching the ground. This minimized cost and maximized useable open space. Amenity areas were included, with a 1000 s.f. rooftop plaza for residents using raised pedestal paver systems, and incorporating seasonal plantings. The overall design provides stormwater management that is functional, serves as an amenity for residents, and is helpful as a marketing tool for attracting prospective buyers.

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Gresham Center for the Arts Plaza

 GreenWorks designed the new Center for the Arts Plaza in downtown Gresham for the city and its non-profit partners. The plaza is the new “living room” for Gresham and features a dramatic integration of the arts using light, water and sound. Key features include “art pillars” dedicated to literature, music, performance and fine art. Additionally, an interactive public fountain, large gathering space for concerts and dynamic lighting effects enhance nighttime activity. The plaza spills out into a “festival street” along Third Street and is host to many community events such as farmer’s markets, civic ceremonies and patrons of the Center for the Arts.

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Southwest First and Main Office Building

The First and Main Office Building is a $100 million, 15-story office tower in the downtown Portland core with views of the waterfront as well as downtown open spaces. The building received LEED Platinum Certification and offers unique amenities, including a large- bike hub, as well a 13,000 s.f. of extensive ecoroof and a 15,000 square foot rooftop terrace. Both of these amenities work to achieve the stormwater management strategies, as well as provide habitat, reduce heat island effect, and provide a pleasant place to relax for office workers. Included in the terrace is a large open plaza zone, looping pathway for exercise, and large planters with a range of lush vegetation. Acting as an oasis in the city, these spaces add to the sustainability and marketability of this high-profile project which includes highly-efficient irrigation, quality materials, and innovative design.

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MODA Center Exterior Project

GreenWorks provided services for the Portland Trail Blazers’ Moda Center Exterior project. The project will beautify the Center’s landscaping with native and drought-resistant plants, provide waterproofing, and replenish the grounds with healthier soils and stormwater facilities in order to reduce the site’s landscaping water use by 20-30% among other progressive initiatives. This work represents the first phase of sustainable improvements around the arena and will further the Trail Blazers’ efforts for sustainability in keeping with their ideals.

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Pendleton Westgate Gateway

This project implemented a high-priority project identified in the Pendleton Court Avenue/River Parkway Master Plan prepared by Greenworks.

The goal of this project was to create a meaningful gateway at the Westgate entrance to downtown Pendleton. The previous conditions at the Westgate Intersection were a confusion of unsafe vehicle traffic circulation, a multitude of cluttered overhaul utilities and barren landscape slants. The City of Pendleton and ODOT reconfigured the intersection to provide safer traffic movements and reduced utility pole/lightpole clutter to create a simpler and safer intersection solution.

GreenWorks worked with the proposed intersection improvements to enhance the visual gateway aspect of the project. GreenWorks designed landscape and interpretive improvements and displayed decorative wall features to create a strong sense of arrival at this intersection. The decorative wall design was reputed at the Riverfront Park location to help tie together corridor improvements

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Fernhill Wetland Mitigation & Master Plan

Fernhill Wetlands is part of a 748 acre parcel near Forest Grove, OR, owned by Clean Water Services and managed in partnership with Forest Grove.  The site, located within the Tualatin River Watershed, consists of agricultural fields, wastewater treatment and other public utility facilities, and several pristine wetlands which are open to the public and draw birders from far and wide who come to observe the many rare migratory bird species that stop at the wetlands during their journey.
With future plans to integrate the wetlands into the wastewater treatment process as part of a natural and sustainable cleansing and cooling approach that preserves the site’s ecological and recreational significance, Clean Water Services commissioned GreenWorks as consultants who bring extensive experience in constructed wetland and green infrastructure design.  In collaboration with CWS, GreenWorks developed a master plan vision for the site which included an overall site layout consisting of treatment wetlands, roads, trails, overlooks and other public spaces; a graphic representation of the water circulation path from wastewater treatment facility all the way to the Tualatin River; accompanied by a collection of artistic photorealistic renderings from various vantage points, which will collectively be used to clearly convey design intent throughout future project phases.

The Unified Sewerage Agency contracted with GreenWorks as part of a team of engineers, biologists, and hydrologists, to develop wetland development concepts for a large-scale wetland mitigation bank, along Gales Creek in Forest Grove. The concept plan recommendations included the establishment of ash forest wetland, emergent marsh and scrub-shrub wetland, wet meadows, and oak woodland upland buffers.

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Zidell Green Infrastructure

The 33-acre Zidell Yards site offers the first holistic, comprehensive opportunity in Portland, Oregon to identify solutions for applying green infrastructure to manage stormwater on one of the largest brownfield remediation and redevelopment sites in Portland.  The goal of this effort was to develop a range of comprehensive green infrastructure scenarios consistent with the constraints of a recently remediated brownfield that can be implemented within the framework of a 15- to 20-year development master plan.

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Lake Oswego 2nd Street Green Street

This green street project is located in the heart of downtown Lake Oswego. With the slight narrowing of the curb to curb width of the street, the City transformed the street into a beautiful modern streetscape within the core of the downtown business district. Widened sidewalks, street lights, benches, driveways, street trees, and unique stormwater planters were all delicately knitted together by the design team to deliver a streetscape project that benefits the surrounding business community while protecting the urban watershed.

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Lake Oswego Demonstration Street Project

GreenWorks closely collaborated with an engineer and urban designer to develop a prototype street reconstruction plan that emphasized a pedestrian friendly environment. Design solutions included narrowing of lane width, replacing left turn lane with landscape median, addition of a rich variety of paving materials in pedestrian zones and placement of street furniture, ornamental street lights, street trees, and annual color accent planting. Our specific responsibilities included final design and specifying of cobblestone paving in crosswalks, pre-cast concrete pavers in parking zone, patterned concrete in pedestrian and furniture zones, as well as landscaping improvements.

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Chambers Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility

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As part of ongoing development at the 930-acre Chambers Creek Properties, GreenWorks developed schematic design and construction documents for long-term sustainable stormwater strategies integrated with perimeter landscape buffers for the existing Chambers Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant (CCWTP) wastewater treatment plant and planned expansions. Working closely with Pierce County staff, Brown & Caldwell engineers, and Michael Willis Architects, GreenWorks developed the landscape buffer concept to visually and physically screen the treatment plant.

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The buffer serves to blend the treatment plant area harmoniously with the dramatic landscape of south Puget Sound, surrounding land uses and future development on and off the plant site. The design incorporates stormwater management facilities that treat plant runoff, provide new recreation trails that connect with existing trail networks, and improve wildlife habitat. The buffer must also accommodate support facilities for bus traffic and large crowds attending the 2010 PGA US Amateur’s Open and the 2015 US Open to be held on the adjacent Chambers Creek Golf Course. In addition to the perimeter buffer, GreenWorks is working on the redevelopment of the plant entrance to improve visibility and enhance circulation.

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Headwaters at Tryon Creek

GreenWorks provided landscape architecture services in master planning a new 2.8 acre mixed residential development near the headwaters of Tryon Creek. The project includes a variety of residential types including elderly housing, town homes, and a Portland Development Commission (PDC) built low-income apartment building. All of the new residential developments, along with an existing apartment building, were designed to be integrated with the daylighting of a tributary of Tryon Creek. The development was coordinated with many local agencies (PDC, Portland Department of Transportation, Portland Parks and Recreation Bureau, and Bureau of Environmental Services) to extend the daylighting project from the headwaters of the tributary in a park adjacent to the site, through the site and adjacent neighborhood to Tryon Creek. The goal of the developer and the design team was to incorporate the buildings, parking, plazas, bridges, and other site elements into a cohesive sustainable site development that takes full advantage of this daylighting opportunity. GreenWorks services include schematic design, design development, construction documentation, and services during construction. This project is certified LEED Silver.

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Lane Community College Health & Wellness Center

GreenWorks provided site design for the new Health and Wellness Building and surrounding open space on the Lane Community College campus in Eugene, Oregon. The team was tasked with creating a dramatic, attractive and sustainable environment for the new academic building’s site. The resulting design demonstrates responsible environmental practices and creates an active “living” classroom for educational opportunities. Rainwater is captured and conveyed into bioswales, translating health and wellness to the physical landscape. The Health and Wellness Facility is located at a major entrance point to campus, making clear circulation and a sense of arrival essential to the design concept. The design connects the multiple levels and pathways surrounding the Health and Wellness Center to the rest of the campus, creating a clear entry sequence that maintains accessibility for all. The result is activated exterior spaces that engage and connect.

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