Canemah Bluff

Canemah Bluff is a 300-acre natural area owned and maintained by Metro within Oregon City. GreenWorks worked with Metro to develop public access to the sensitive oak savannah and woodland, which included improving hiking & walking trails, new boardwalk, foot-bridge, and scenic overlook.

During the Public Involvement phase, GreenWorks helped engage the community and gain support from a highly motivated neighborhood group. We prepared a design that reflected both Metro’s and the neighborhood’s goals for minimal impact to natural resources, yet provided for a safe place for users to enjoy the natural area. GreenWorks produced graphic presentation materials that helped convey the design so both the client and community could fully understand and appreciate what the end product would look like once built.

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Fairview Woods Park

Fairview Woods Park is a renovation of an existing open space to a neighborhood Park and an example of where we successfully used a sustainability filter to improve park conditions and facilities. Some trails and interpretation existed at the park but graffiti, inappropriate park use and gunfire were common in the park and neighbors were concerned about safety. GreenWorks and SWCA environmental developed a conceptual plan and construction documents to address park safety and upgrade facilities to meet neighborhood recreation needs and provide access to wetland and riparian areas. We also addressed creek and wetland protection and sustainability on site by including native plant community restoration, vegetation management to provide visual corridors, minimal tree removal, use of downed woody debris for interpretive and plaza features, wetland trail improvements, trail decommissioning, minimized parking including ADA space, and upgraded trails to meet ADA standards.

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Minto Island Bicycle & Pedestrian Bridge

The City of Salem and Salem’s Urban Renewal Agency are moving forward with plans to connect three major urban parks and more than 20 miles of trails along the Willamette River.  The Minto Island Bicycle & Pedestrian Bridge is a tied-arch design spanning 600-feet over the Willamette Slough, connecting the existing path in Riverfront Park to the 900-acre Minto Brown Island Park.

GreenWorks developed a conceptual framework that integrates the bridge terminus in Riverfront Park with the existing circulation, the 30’ diameter “Eco Earth” art globe, as well as the existing park infrastructure.  New terraced seatwalls provide additional park seating overlooking the Slough, and are complemented with accent plantings that help anchor the bridge terminus.

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Cape Horn Trail

Cape Horn Trail is an eight-mile trail in Skamania County located twenty-six miles east of Vancouver, WA. GreenWorks is providing services for the US Forest Service for improvements to an existing trail, which has two at grade crossings where hikers and horseback riders traverse the heavily traveled State Route 14. To improve safety for trail users, the Forest Service and WSDOT are constructing pedestrian underpass tunnels at these two crossings. GreenWorks developed schematic designs for the tunnel entrances and provided construction design drawings for the tunnel fascias, which include stonewall construction, custom metal guardrail fencing design and planting design around the entrances. The design of the tunnel fascias incorporate locally quarried Columbia River Basalt to form walls that echo other examples of historic basalt stone work in the Columbia Gorge.

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Springwater Trail Spur

GreenWorks assisted the City of Gresham with the design of the Springwater Spur Trail project, part of the Phase One of the Main City Park Master Plan. The trail completed a significant connection between the existing Springwater Trail and Downtown Gresham through the popular 21.6-acre Main City Park. GreenWorks helped to ensure the design met the provisions of the grants and funding requirements by OPRD, ODOT and Metro. The Spur was designed as an ADA accessible, multi-use trail for pedestrians, bicycles, service and emergency vehicles. The design of the Springwater Trail Spur supports the City’s goals for sustainability by incorporating stormwater quality facilities to treat trail run-off and existing parking lot facilities that were formerly untreated. Associated features of the project include gateway design elements, landscaping, model stormwater management facilities, irrigation, lighting and trail signage. Finally, the Springwater Trail Spur created a sense of place by incorporating a new trailhead and prominent gateway feature at the south end of the trail where it abuts the Springwater Trail.

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Cape Disappointment

Cape Disappointment (formerly Ft. Canby State Park) has a vibrant history, including native peoples, explorers, US military and most recently state parks. The 1800 acre Washington State Park at the mouth of the Columbia River contains over two-hundred campsites, a boat ramp, day use areas, interpretive center and many historic coastal fortification structures. The environment is very dynamic, with coastal erosion threatening approximately ninety of the existing campsites. GreenWorks led a multi-disciplinary team in developing a 20 year Master Plan for the park, identifying new visitor service centers, administrative headquarters, maintenance facilities, multi-use trail network, interpretive facilities and restoration areas. In addition, GreenWorks oversaw the preparation of a Draft and Final Environmental Impact Statement for the project.

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Rock Creek Greenway

Hillsboro Parks and Recreation contracted with GreenWorks and an interdisciplinary team to evaluate opportunities and constraints and propose recommendations for a 2500 lineal foot section of Rock Creek. Project goals included reconnecting the creek to its floodplain, enhancing floodplain fish and wildlife habitat, and providing passive recreation opportunities for the greenway. GreenWorks designed a concept plan including new stormwater treatment facilities between adjacent developments and the riparian corridor, a backwater habitat, overall vegetation management strategies, trails, overlooks, and a pedestrian bridge crossing.

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Gateway Green

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Gateway Green is a 25-acre site located in East Portland at the confluence of two major freeways. This previously unused remnant landscape has a host of complicated public access challenges making the prospect of creating a park seemingly impossible. Community leaders and advocates who saw a potential for reclaiming this forgotten landscape have been instrumental in framing a vision and rallying support for developing the site into a usable park space. 

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Because of the challenges Gateway Green presented—its size, unique terrain, close proximity to light rail, and lack of adequate access for pedestrians—off-road cycling was identified as one of the many viable, long-term uses envisioned for the site. In 2017, temporary off-road bike trails were constructed as a means to activate the site and deter homeless camping. The immediate success of the bike facilities has brought local and national recognition to the project, which in turn has given the City of Portland and the project partners motivation and support to push forward with refining the long-term vision to include other uses. 

A plan has recently been developed to guide future work to restore habitat, improve access, and enhance other recreational activities. The crux of the design challenge has been to create a plan that balances active and passive uses along with innovative urban habitat restoration. 

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Robust support for developing the site has been led by the highly visible and active group, Friends of Gateway Green (FoGG). Since 2008, FoGG has envisioned Gateway Green as a place that could provide a much-needed site for off-road cycling, and other outdoor recreation in East Portland. FoGG’s advocacy and partnership building has made the project become a reality.